1. http://hellholehello.tumblr.com/post/100615778678/swedishdressage-hellholehello-reblogged-your

    hellholehello:

    swedishdressage:

    swedishdressage:

    hellholehello reblogged your photoset and added:

    Do you guys wash your horses in the winter time?

    Nope, only if they are VERY sweaty and if so we blanket them and let them dry indoors. I tend to just sponge off mud and sweat around the girth and saddle area, and brush…

    We have hot water but not a solarium, now THAT would be a dream! Callie HATES cold baths but enjoys warm ones, such a surprise, haha. She is stabled overnight but turned out all day into the late afternoon/evening so she has time to dry overnight, thank God.

    Solariums aren’t that expensive second hand? I mean well they are, everything is expensive second hand but I’ve seen them for like a couple of hundred, I thought they’d be like thousands. I think there’s hot water at my yard but I don’t know how to use it :(
    So I just run into the house with a bucket sometimes if it’s very cold :P still feel sorry for him though, sometimes I take a cold shower so I know what it’s like for my poor Mogali :P

    Yeah but it’s not my barn, I board, so it wouldn’t really make sense for me to buy one for the barn, hehe

    Reblogged from: hellholehello
  2. http://hellholehello.tumblr.com/post/100615778678/swedishdressage-hellholehello-reblogged-your

    swedishdressage:

    hellholehello reblogged your photoset and added:

    Do you guys wash your horses in the winter time?

    Nope, only if they are VERY sweaty and if so we blanket them and let them dry indoors. I tend to just sponge off mud and sweat around the girth and saddle area, and brush…

    We have hot water but not a solarium, now THAT would be a dream! Callie HATES cold baths but enjoys warm ones, such a surprise, haha. She is stabled overnight but turned out all day into the late afternoon/evening so she has time to dry overnight, thank God.

    Reblogged from: hellholehello
  3. hellholehello reblogged your photoset and added:

    Do you guys wash your horses in the winter time?

    Nope, only if they are VERY sweaty and if so we blanket them and let them dry indoors. I tend to just sponge off mud and sweat around the girth and saddle area, and brush the rest!

  4. to-breed-or-not-to-breed:

    swedishdressage:

    It’s THAT time of the year again…

    better some mud* than an physically weak and mentally unsound animal that’s cooped up 24/7!

    *yeah I know it isn’t ‘some mud’ it’s a good hour of awkward labor and a week of showers that never get the dirt out of everywhere and your instructor STILL finds the one spot that isn’t shiny-clean and call you out on it but.

    happy healthy ponies.

    Haha we usually say that she goes “to the spa” when she comes in like this!  First mud bath, then shower, hahaha.

    Reblogged from: to-breed-or-not-to-breed
  5. When I got Callie last year I didn’t have a full time job, only some extra while I studied, and therefore I didn’t have any decent money to buy a horse. The solution to this was to take in a horse for training or free lease, and so came Callie. I only tried her and she was nice, so I took her. I have grown very fond of her and now that I DO have money, we will make an offer to buy her (We being me and my dad) but I am not sure if the owner will accept the bid we are prepared to pay for her. This means that I am starting to look at horses for sale now, in case this falls apart since I don’t want to be without a horse. Question is though, what do I want??

    I am so torn here because I am well aware that I can get more talent, more movement and more power for my money if I buy a baby horse, that is 3-4 years old, than if I go for something say 6 or above. At the same time, I am soooo eager to start showing properly again so of course a more trained horse would be lovely, but then it is likely that they will be more average for the price than a younger horse in the same price range, due to more training (it’s all logical). You pay a lot for training.

    I don’t doubt that I will be able to ride and train a baby horse, Callie was 4 when I got her and I have put in a lot of work on her, and also gotten a lot of praise for the work I have done and the progress, so it feels like a baby would be the best way for me to go.

  6. lladystoneheart replied to your post “More break through”

    could consider warming her up for a while in a far apart spaced hands getting her to stretch down as far as you can get her but change direction a lot to distract her from wanting to look around & lift her head (if you’re not doing this already)

    That is what I did today to get through to her when she worked herslef up (she goes CRAZY and starts blowing like a dragon and stepping around) but from now on I will warm her up like that to get her more focused I think.

  7. missmeewhenimgone replied to your post “Shopping!”

    excuse my naivety but what are spur covers??

    After looking it up I realised the proper word i “spur protector”! You know the things you put around your heel so they dont rub the boot!

  8. I’ve never had a horse that questions me in the way Callie does. It might be because she is a mare and less inclined to just accept what I am asking for, but regardless of the reason, every day we have an issue to work with.

    One BIG thing that has given me problems at shows is the fact that she ALWAYS wants to look at things, with her head high, and she is absolutely impossible to get through to when she does. It’s like I’m not even there. Today was the first time I could get through, and I did that by taking her into a tight little spin, with her head low. When a horse lowers their head, the pulse goes down and they calm down, which happened now, and suddenly she was with me again! Amazing feeling. We are talking like western low, REALLY low.

  9. I always have some awesome discussions on training with mah girl dressagedawg so for today’s topic, I’m going to go with the dreaded consistency. I have a baby horse as we all know (she is growing up way too fast by that mare is still a whelp no matter what you say) and a BIG issue for us has been to be consisent with the aids. See, Callie needs to be quick quick off the aids or she gets very inactive and starts dragging her feet, and in turn get very strung out. I have mentioned many times that I have worked on this by doing a million transitions and have her respond to a light nudge RIGHT AWAY.

    A new issue that came from this is that now she tries to barge away with HUGE strides since that is a lot easier than being quick, which also makes her strung out. This puts me in a very difficult position since I don’t want to kill her forward energy by stopping her, but at the same time I can’t let her just launch off with me.

    So to not ruin the energy I create by making her quick off my aids, and to be able to be consistent in my aids, what I have been doing is to engage her with leg yields and super super quick and small half halts. She has to respond forward INSTANTLY when I ask for it, but she also has to be equally quick  to collect when I ask for that, and most importantly, keep the energy while collecting. Qithout keeping that energy she will never be able to do more collection later, and if she barges off, she won’t be able to either. She has to be like a rubbe rband, expanding and retracting, and I have to make sure that I don’t hinder her.

    In turn, I have to be very quick with giving her some slack when she responds with collection, so I don’t end up holding her back too much. Quick, quick aids. So, so tough.

  10. Ah this is another one that could make a novel on its own, but I will try!

    There are two bits on a double, the snaffle and the curb, with a pair of reins each. The curb bit has a chain attached to it. Now, if you would just let the curb rein ahng loose, and just use the snaffle rein, the bridle would work just as regular snaffle. It is important that you can ride your horse with just the snaffle, if you can’t ride it as well on a snaffle as a double, you shouldn’t use a double, simple as.

    If you then add the curb, it adds leverage through the shanks and the chain. The reins will put pressure on the neck, under the cheek and in the mouth. When you pull the reins the shanks will tilt towards you, which makes the mouthpiece rotate forward, pressing the mouthpiece port into the roof of the mouth, more or less depending on the shape and size of it. At the same time it will also press down on the tongue. The forward motion of the upper parts of the shanks (commonly known as the purchase) will press the neckpiece down, creating pressure on the neck. The curb chain will apply pressure on the cheek.

    A curb bit is pretty sharp, so it is not something to use if you aren’t well experienced, with a steady, independent hand. If you need the reins to balance, do not use a double!

    Hope this answered your question!

  11. Well, first of all, I would porbably try and stay far away from a horse that rears, it is by far my worst pet peeve and to be honest, scares the living bejesus out of me when they rear. BUT I have gathered a lot of good advice on rearing horses over the years.

    The appriach differs a little depending on HOW your horse rears. Some horses do it as a bit of a protest thing, and can be quite balanced when they rear. They don’t go as far up and they don’t flail, they just rise. A horse that does this you can correct. There are several ways of doing this but one is to go forward. If you feel that they are stopping and starting to lift, be quick and do whatever you need to do to make them go forward. I am not much for punishment  but a horse that rears is dangerous so all bets are off. As little as possible but as much as necessary.

    Another way to correct a balanced horse is to move them around or sideways. Generally they find it very hard to rear with the back legs crossed so if you feel them lifting the front, or you end in a situation where you know they could be triggered to rear, leg yield.

    You can also spin them, so when they try, pull the inner rein and spin them around. With all these techniques, you will of course praise when they do the correct thing (Not rear)!

    For a horse that rears unbalanced and just throws themselves up in panic/adrenaline rush, stay away from the walls and GET OFF. Learn how to do it in a safe way because a horse that has no body control going up is very likely to go over and you do not want to be on them when they do. Then work on the underlying issue from the ground. I don’t have enough knowledge to tell you what to do to solve an issue like that but it usually stems from respect or fear issues.

  12. Thank you so much!, will look for those! I have tried a race safe and quite liked that, there is also a few brands that do similar stuff like those over here. I like them quite soft and bendy with lots of panels, instead of one stiff one. I need to be able to move since I use them both for jumping and hacking, and the USG does look like it fits the bill!

  13. Ok so I have put together a possible shopping list for Sweden Horse Show. This is NOT saying I will buy all of this, or even any of it, but these are things that I am in the market for and might buy if I find a good deal or fall in love with something. A few of these things are things that I NEED so hopefully I’ll find what I am after there! Here we go:

    • Spur covers in leather (2 pairs)
    • Training rug, wool (black or navy)
    • Spur straps
    • Belt, Pikeur with stirrup on, black
    • White breeches, Candela
    • Brown and/or black gloves
    • Winter coat, down
    • Brown dressage boots (for the horse)
    • Body protector
    • Grooming bag
    • Riding socks
    • Fleece jacket
    • Sheepskin glove
    • Ear cardigan
    • Dubarry boots
    • Sprenger eggbutt bit
    • Sheepskin fluffs for halter
    • Fun saddle pads and polos
    • Breeches on sale

    Also  in the market for a future double bridle, I want a Döbert so will look after one at the expo.

  14. http://swedishdressage.tumblr.com/post/100494308775/be-equine-replied-to-your-post-gotothebank

    be-equine:

    swedishdressage:

    be-equine:

    swedishdressage:

    be-equine replied to your post “gotothebank replied to your post “One of the Swedish U25 riders sold…”

    i personally don’t compete in it because i like jumps but it is not something to be seen as ‘small’ and ‘petty’ and a ‘waste of a horse’, if this person is serious in it which btw she…

    oh well! At least he’s not wasted by becoming a paddock ornament or something. He’s got a job, he’ll be happy. IDK I guess I’m used to hearing it. Great dressage prospect turns into a hacking horse. They have the money to buy and IMPORT a horse of such to the country (IT IS NOT CHEAP TO GET ANYTHING HERE). 

    And like someone mentioned most of the time Hacking and Dressage go hand in hand over here. Oh well, what ever. I’m done in this loop.. idek the horse or anything, don’t really care, just felt a bit annoyed that you see our Show Scene of low quality, reading from your comments. 

    No no I don’t see it as low quality! I just felt sad to lose the horse from our country and then not get to see him in the dressage ring since I feel that is where he belongs. You are completely right that at least he is not used as a paddock ornament but he was in our national squad and I was super sad to see him go, hence my emotional post. I have nothing against the hacking/showing scene (I wouldn’t mind trying it myself) per se, just against this particular horse switching from dressage to that. Didn’t mean to offend the hacking scene, I have a friend in the UK who is a multiple champion.

    ahh ok, sorry, i get where you’re coming from now. Sorry!! 

    Sorry too, I tend to sound well snarky when I get upset, it doesn’t translate well in text. My bad!

    Reblogged from: be-equine
  15. http://swedishdressage.tumblr.com/post/100494308775/be-equine-replied-to-your-post-gotothebank

    be-equine:

    swedishdressage:

    be-equine replied to your post “gotothebank replied to your post “One of the Swedish U25 riders sold…”

    i personally don’t compete in it because i like jumps but it is not something to be seen as ‘small’ and ‘petty’ and a ‘waste of a horse’, if this person is serious in it which btw she…

    oh well! At least he’s not wasted by becoming a paddock ornament or something. He’s got a job, he’ll be happy. IDK I guess I’m used to hearing it. Great dressage prospect turns into a hacking horse. They have the money to buy and IMPORT a horse of such to the country (IT IS NOT CHEAP TO GET ANYTHING HERE). 

    And like someone mentioned most of the time Hacking and Dressage go hand in hand over here. Oh well, what ever. I’m done in this loop.. idek the horse or anything, don’t really care, just felt a bit annoyed that you see our Show Scene of low quality, reading from your comments. 

    No no I don’t see it as low quality! I just felt sad to lose the horse from our country and then not get to see him in the dressage ring since I feel that is where he belongs. You are completely right that at least he is not used as a paddock ornament but he was in our national squad and I was super sad to see him go, hence my emotional post. I have nothing against the hacking/showing scene (I wouldn’t mind trying it myself) per se, just against this particular horse switching from dressage to that. Didn’t mean to offend the hacking scene, I have a friend in the UK who is a multiple champion.

    Reblogged from: be-equine
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